Categories
What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#96)

Quote I thought was more profound the more I thought about it:

It is easy to be certain. One has only to be sufficiently vague.

Charles Sanders Peirce

Why Read? Advice From Harold Bloom:

On how to read poems:

“. . . Wherever possible, memorize them. . . . Silent intensive rereadings of a shorter poem that truly finds you should be followed by recitations to yourself until you discover that you are in possession of the poem. . . . Committed to memory, the poem will possess you, and you will be able to read it more closely, which great poetry demands and rewards.”

General summary of some of the points mentioned, but it’s worth a read.

Reading can help us alleviate loneliness and get to know more people on an intimate level than we could otherwise. It can provide greater self-knowledge, as the words of others give us a lens for understanding ourselves. As a “difficult pleasure,” the ways in which books challenge us help us to grow. Wrestling with a text teaches us a great deal about our capabilities and our values. There is also immense satisfaction and increased confidence when we conquer it. Reading helps you to become your full, autonomous self.

Categories
What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#90)

Book excerpt I was thinking about:

“We should never label our practice sessions as “good” or “bad.” Any time you get to the meditation seat is good meditation.” (Lodro Rinzler, Sit Like a Buddha)

Resist the urge to label your practice efforts!


Our brave new merged world:

A great little read on the changes afoot in the work world and where we live. The physical location of where we live has never felt more significant from a social perspective, while less significant from a work-perspective.

As jobs will less force people to move, people will move areas less often, and the areas where people live will be less set by jobs. As life at work will be less social, people will have to get more of their socializing from elsewhere. Some of this will come from remote socializing, but much will still probably come from in-person socializing. So people will choose where they live more based on family, friends, leisure activities, and non-work social connections. Churches, clubs, and shared interest socializing will increase in importance. People will also pick where to live more based on climate, price, and views. Beach towns will boom, and the largest cities will lose.
Because people will move areas less often, the social connections they make in school will last them longer into life. Yet today school is widely talked about as a preparation for work. So schools will be torn between wanting to be in-person to promote local social connections, and remote to promote work skills. Perhaps schools will split, with core work-related classes being remote but electives and “after school activities” being in-person. Work hours will be less rigid, and it will be easier to do non-work tasks during usual work times.


Categories
What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#84)

Last week was moving week! That being said this week’s update will be a little shorter than normal. Moving house is a lot of work, and we’re lucky to have the option to do it so no complaints about it being “hard” as such. Normal life stops while you are in-between and there was not much time for reflection, but I re-learned that I/we are pretty good at moving and I don’t expect this to be anywhere near the last.

Some reminder learnings for myself for next time:

  • Write more descriptive descriptions on moving boxes, at least on one side
  • The stuff I pack first or last tends to be the most important – either I really want to be sure what I’m packing is safe and well-organized (so I do it first and best) or I can’t live without it (and I end up hand carrying or packing last). I should look hard at the stuff “in the middle” and try to get rid of half of it
  • Money spent on a good moving company is money well-spent

Here are some other things I felt worth sharing from last week.


Book excerpt I enjoyed:

“I hate the expression ‘don’t reinvent the wheel.’ What rubbish! If the wheel hadn’t been reinvented, we’d still be using stone wheels.” (James Whittaker, Career Superpowers)

Categories
Misc

Thirty minutes

Yesterday I found myself in the car for an extended period of time, something very rare this year. After a few stops along the way, I decided to switch attention away from the new RTJ album (so good) and switched on a recent Tim Ferriss Show with Hugh Jackman. I’ve missed listening to podcasts now that my commute is gone (really the only thing I miss) and this one was, as usual, great.

I was thinking about the beginning where he talks about what he learned from Patrick Stewart:

And he said to me that when he was about 60, he realized that he was never going to read all the books that he wanted to read in his life. He did the calculation. He decided that no matter what time his call was—let’s say he’s picked up at five—whatever time he would have woken up, he wakes up 30 minutes earlier, gets a cup of tea, and goes back to bed, and he reads. He said, “I don’t read the paper because it makes me angry. I don’t read my emails because it usually makes me anxious, gets my mind going.”

I think all the time about how I’d like to read more but there doesn’t seem to be enough time in the day.