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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#79)

Inspiration for changing the world in seven charts:

https://www.outsideonline.com/2414779/world-change-charts/


Sound and vision facts about birds:

Barn Owls can pinpoint the location of a mouse thirty from feet away, strictly by sound, and then fly to that exact spot even if the mouse makes no further sound.


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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#78)

Two book excerpts that were related that I loved this week:

“It was a brilliant idea: You have no responsibility to live up to what other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be like they expect me to be. It’s their mistake, not my failing.” (Richard P. Feynman, Ralph Leighton, Edward Hutchings, and Albert R. Hibbs, “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!“)

“Some people may have thought that this book was too personal, too confessional. But what these people think about me is none of my business.” (Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird)


Walking is making a major comeback:

The family and I have been enjoying long walks around the farm for the past few months, and recently discovered a good route to walk to the grandparents place directly. There is something very unique about walking a good distance alone or with others. I always seem to end up feeling better than before I left.

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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#77)

Book excerpt I enjoyed:

“With myself, I have to hold the line. There are areas within myself where I CANNOT compromise. I am going to work hard. I am going to train hard. I am going to improve myself. I am not going to rest on my laurels. I am going to own my mistakes and confront them. I am going to face my demons. I’m not going to give up, or give out, or give in. I’m going to stand. I am going to maintain my self-discipline. And on those points there will be No Compromise. NOT NOW. NOT EVER.”” (Jocko Willink, Discipline Equals Freedom)


The hidden purpose of why I’m listening:

I haven’t even listened to this conversation, but I’ve been thinking about the following paragraph regularly ever since I read it (and plan to listen to the full episode).

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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#75)

Book excerpt I enjoyed:

Naive passion, which promotes work done in ignorance of obstacles, becomes — with courage — informed passion, which promotes work done in full acceptance of those obstacles.” (David Bayles, Ted Orland, Art & Fear)


We are all collection of ideas:

“I realized that I could lose myself in a character. I could live in a character. It was a choice. And when I finished with that, I took a month to remember who I was. ‘What do I believe? What are my politics? What do I like and dislike?’ It took me a while, and I was depressed going back into my concerns and my politics. But there was a shift that had already happened. And the shift was, ‘Wait a second. If I can put Jim Carrey aside for four months, who is Jim Carrey? Who the hell is that?’ … I know now he does not really exist. He’s ideas. … Jim Carrey was an idea my parents gave me. Irish-Scottish-French was an idea I was given. Canadian was an idea that I was given. I had a hockey team and a religion and all of these things that cobble together into this kind of Frankenstein monster, this representation. It’s like an avatar. These are all the things I am. You are not an actor, or a lawyer. No one is a lawyer. There are lawyers, law is practiced, but no one is a lawyer. There is no one, in fact, there.

From Jim Carrey ( @JimCarrey)

I was thinking about this over the week, shared via Tim Ferris.

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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#74)

Book excerpt I enjoyed:

“Remember our rule of thumb: The more scared we are of a work or calling, the more sure we can be that we have to do it.” (Steven Pressfield, The War of Art)


A commencement address delivered remotely:

I’m not so worried about the dangers of mental junk food. That’s because I’ve found that many of the true intellectuals I’ve met take pleasure in mental junk food too. Having a taste for trashy rom-coms hasn’t rotted their brain or made them incapable of writing great history or doing deep physics.

No, my worry is that, especially now that you’re out of college, you won’t put enough really excellent stuff into your brain

In college, you get assigned hard things. You’re taught to look at paintings and think about science in challenging ways. After college, most of us resolve to keep doing this kind of thing, but we’re busy and our brains are tired at the end of the day. Months and years go by. We get caught up in stuff, settle for consuming Twitter and, frankly, journalism. Our maximum taste shrinks. Have you ever noticed that 70 percent of the people you know are more boring at 30 than they were at 20?

This really made me think. Do you think you are more interesting now than you were 10 years ago?

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/05/commencement-address-too-honest-have-been-delivered-person/611572