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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#78)

Two book excerpts that were related that I loved this week:

“It was a brilliant idea: You have no responsibility to live up to what other people think you ought to accomplish. I have no responsibility to be like they expect me to be. It’s their mistake, not my failing.” (Richard P. Feynman, Ralph Leighton, Edward Hutchings, and Albert R. Hibbs, “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!“)

“Some people may have thought that this book was too personal, too confessional. But what these people think about me is none of my business.” (Anne Lamott, Bird by Bird)


Walking is making a major comeback:

The family and I have been enjoying long walks around the farm for the past few months, and recently discovered a good route to walk to the grandparents place directly. There is something very unique about walking a good distance alone or with others. I always seem to end up feeling better than before I left.

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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#72)

Quote I enjoyed:

”The best test of a person’s intelligence is their capacity for making a summary”

Lytton Strachey

Book excerpt I was thinking about:

“Long-distance running suits my personality, though, and of all the habits I’ve acquired over my lifetime I’d have to say this one has been the most helpful, the most meaningful. Running without a break for more than two decades has also made me stronger, both physically and emotionally.” (Haruki Murakami and Philip Gabriel, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running)

How would you answer the question: what habit have you acquired during your lifetime that has been the most helpful, the most meaningful?


The system that actually worked:

A great peek behind the huge growth in internet usage during the pandemic.

The surge in traffic, on the internet as a whole and on AT&T’s part of the network, is extraordinary in a way that the phrase 20 percent increase doesn’t quite capture. AT&T’s network is carrying an extra 71 petabytes of data every day. How much is 71 petabytes? One comparison: Back at the end of 2014, AT&T’s total network traffic was 56 petabytes a day; in just a few weeks, AT&T has accommodated more new traffic every day than its total daily traffic six years ago. (During the pandemic, the AT&T network has been carrying about 426 petabytes a day—one petabyte is 1 million gigabytes.)

All kinds of digital communication usage is up as well:

On AT&T’s network, customers are spending 33 percent more time talking on their cellphones, and they’re sending 40 percent more text messages, compared with January and February. Twice during the pandemic customers set a record for text messages,—once in mid-March as it started to build, and again on Easter weekend, sending more than 23,000 in a single second, besting the old record of 15,000, set on New Year’s Eve.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/05/miracle-internet-not-breaking/611212