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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#73)

Quote I enjoyed:

A positive attitude causes a chain reaction of positive thoughts, events, and outcomes.”

Wade Boggs

Book excerpt I was thinking about:

“Martin Luther King was asked how, as a pacifist, he could be an admirer of Air Force General Daniel “Chappie” James, then the nation’s highest-ranking black officer. Dr. King replied, “I judge people by their own principles—not by my own.”” (Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and Influence People)


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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#72)

Quote I enjoyed:

”The best test of a person’s intelligence is their capacity for making a summary”

Lytton Strachey

Book excerpt I was thinking about:

“Long-distance running suits my personality, though, and of all the habits I’ve acquired over my lifetime I’d have to say this one has been the most helpful, the most meaningful. Running without a break for more than two decades has also made me stronger, both physically and emotionally.” (Haruki Murakami and Philip Gabriel, What I Talk About When I Talk About Running)

How would you answer the question: what habit have you acquired during your lifetime that has been the most helpful, the most meaningful?


The system that actually worked:

A great peek behind the huge growth in internet usage during the pandemic.

The surge in traffic, on the internet as a whole and on AT&T’s part of the network, is extraordinary in a way that the phrase 20 percent increase doesn’t quite capture. AT&T’s network is carrying an extra 71 petabytes of data every day. How much is 71 petabytes? One comparison: Back at the end of 2014, AT&T’s total network traffic was 56 petabytes a day; in just a few weeks, AT&T has accommodated more new traffic every day than its total daily traffic six years ago. (During the pandemic, the AT&T network has been carrying about 426 petabytes a day—one petabyte is 1 million gigabytes.)

All kinds of digital communication usage is up as well:

On AT&T’s network, customers are spending 33 percent more time talking on their cellphones, and they’re sending 40 percent more text messages, compared with January and February. Twice during the pandemic customers set a record for text messages,—once in mid-March as it started to build, and again on Easter weekend, sending more than 23,000 in a single second, besting the old record of 15,000, set on New Year’s Eve.

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2020/05/miracle-internet-not-breaking/611212


Categories
What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#71)

A quote that I was thinking about:

The best test of a person’s intelligence is their capacity for making a summary.

Lytton Strachey

Why we should bring blogs back:

Twitter is dominating the deployment of information currently, and I agree that it would be good if there was something more behind it.

I’m not sure if this particular idea will take hold or not. I do believe, however, that we need innovative thinking not just about medical treatments, but also about how we handle the deployment of information relevant to our response.

A lot in here is about the infatuation with Twitter, which is great at some things (i.e. a lot of obscure smart people are getting the attention they deserve) and not great at many others (most ideas can’t be compressed into 240 characters and tweet threads aren’t any fun to read):

In this proposal, these experts wouldn’t abandon social media. On the contrary, they would continue to actively engage with these platforms to summarize their ideas and comment on events, while the platforms would continue to work their algorithmic magic to amplify the more impactful content. The big change, however, is that this short-form content can now be pointing back to their longer, more stable elaborations.


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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#70)

Quote I enjoyed:

“Feelings are just visitors. Let them come and go.”

Mooji

Thoughts on running and marathons…and a lot more:

Ok, I love this subject of course, but this was truly a great read.

And so, in the spirit of experimentation, I decided to see if I could run fast marathons back to back. One of the great mysteries of running is the level of effort that breaks you. To a point, going harder makes you stronger, like blowing air into a tire that gets ever firmer. But there’s a limit, and when you cross it the tire pops. Your muscles collapse and your motivation falters. Each marathon made me feel like a rag doll. It could take months before I was ready to run hard again. But maybe, I thought, this year would be different. Perhaps there was air left in the tire for running the New York City Marathon just three weeks after Chicago.

To a point, going harder makes you stronger, like blowing air into a tire that gets ever firmer. But there’s a limit, and when you cross it the tire pops.

My two older boys had come to cheer me on in Chicago, but the youngest one, then 4, had stayed in New York. I had a feeling that I would never be this fast again, and I wanted him to see me running well too. Parents can never know for sure what will inspire their kids or scar them, and few people are better at seeing through our vanities and pretensions than our children. Still, at the very least, he would get a sense of this thing I do when I put on my running shoes.

https://www.wired.com/story/marathon-speed-tech-training-outrunning-my-past


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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#69)

Quote I was thinking about:

“An amateur practices until they can play it correctly, a professional practices until they can’t play it incorrectly.” – Unknown


Creativity is not something you either have or don’t: