Categories
Misc

Fall music rotation

I have always listed to a lot of music, and always have music playing while I work, cook and generally anytime I can put something on I will. Here is a selection of some of the music keeping me company during my favorite time of year.

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What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#93)

Article excerpt I enjoyed:

INTERVIEWER: You seem very troubled—but not by death?
BALDWIN: Yes, true, but not at all by death. I’m troubled over getting my work done and over all the things I’ve not learned. It’s useless to be troubled by death, because then, of course, you can’t live at all.” (Margaret Jull Costa, The Art of Fiction No. 78)

https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/2994/the-art-of-fiction-no-78-james-baldwin


Book excerpt I was thinking about:

“Just as long-distance runners push through pain to experience the pleasure of “runner’s high,” I have largely gotten past the pain of my mistake making and instead enjoy the pleasure that comes with learning from it. I believe that with practice you can change your habits and experience the same “mistake learner’s high.”” (Ray Dalio, Principles)


Categories
Misc

Functionally illiterate

We all know someone who seems to know way more than us. I can think of a whole universe of people who I admire and stand in awe of the things they (seem to) know. Sometimes I even catch myself thinking they must be way smarter than me.

Of course, the smart thing is not true, and it’s a poor use of time to compare yourself with others. But the knowing more thing? Yes, that’s always true. Someone always will know more. But even they didn’t know at one point. They learned from those before them.

General James Mattis pointed out in his autobiography that “Reading is an honor and a gift,” he explains, “from a warrior or a historian who—a decade or a thousand decades ago—set aside time to write.” Yet many people spurn this gift and still consider themselves educated. “If you haven’t read hundreds of books,” Mattis says, “you’re functionally illiterate.”

Categories
Misc Work

Learning like a mad scientist

David Perell recently wrote a tweetstorm/article about the recent US Open golf champion Bryson DeChambeau and how:

He just won his first major championship and is changing how golf is played at the highest levels. People call him “The Mad Scientist of Golf.”

I casually follow golf (and sports in general) and hadn’t even heard about this guy but this caught my attention. I’ve been thinking about it all week and going back to the article again and again for some inspiration as I think about how to be better in my chosen craft. Here are some themes that I am trying to apply in my own ways.

Categories
What I learned last week

What I learned last week (#92)

Book excerpt I was thinking about:

Whatever the needs of the moment, I had a choice: I could do what was required calmly, patiently, and attentively, or do it in a state of panic. Every moment of the day—indeed, every moment throughout one’s life—offers an opportunity to be relaxed and responsive or to suffer unnecessarily.” (Sam Harris, Waking Up)

You do have a choice and an opportunity in every moment, even though it might not feel like it sometimes.


The logistics of distributing a vaccine in the 19th century versus today:

Distributing a COVID vaccine to billions of people will be challenging. We will require vials, needles, cold storage, air travel, trained health care professionals and much more. The challenge of distributing a smallpox vaccine in the 19th century was even greater because aside from fewer resources the vaccine, cowpox, was geographically rare and infected humans only with difficulty. Moreover, the best method of storing the vaccine was in a person but that worked only until the person’s immune system defeated the virus. Thus, a relay-race of vaccine couriers was created to distribute the vaccine around the world.

https://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2020/09/the-distribution-of-vaccines-in-the-19th-century.html

Interesting history of using cohorts of human vaccine couriers to distribute a vaccine. Never realized or thought about that until now.

For a summary of the modern day challenges that we’re facing, this is worth watching:

3:22 is when the good stuff starts. Interesting info about the challenges involved in producing and moving the vaccine.